Archive for January, 2018

FTV 575 An Evening of Insurrections with Harry Gamboa, Jr.

Posted in Update on January 23rd, 2018

This week on From the Vault we present a relatively new addition to our collection, a panel discussion at the J Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles entitled, See What You Mean: An Evening of Insurrections with Harry Gamboa, Jr. This panel was recorded on Saturday, October 28th, 2017 and features several artists that helped expand the role of art in California Latino and Chicano communities, including painter Ramiro Gomez, artist and archivist Guadalupe Rosales, and UCLA ethnomusicologist and author Chon Noriega.

Gamboa, Jr., the focus of the panel, was just concluding a year-long Artist in Residency at the Getty Museum, and has been an important component of the Chicano community since co-founding the Latino artist collective Asco (Spanish for nausea or repulsion) based in East Los Angeles in 1972. As a world class photographer, his work is in the permanent collections at the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian American Artist Museum in Washington DC, the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, and the Autry Museum in Los Angeles, among others.

Kathy Carpenter from the Getty Museum introduces the panel.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

FTV 574 The History of Feminism, Part 1

Posted in Update on January 13th, 2018

Throughout history, women have suffered many injustices in the workplace, including unequal wages, unsafe work conditions and predatory sexual harassment from male administrators. This week on From the Vault, we’ll hear recordings to help us make sense of some of the Feminist efforts throughout history that have helped drive the changes happening in the present. We start off with a 1982 program titled Feminism in the 1800’s, featuring author Ellen DuBois (reading from a 1948 speech by Elizabeth Cady Stanton), who has written extensively about Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Mary Wollstonecraft, Frances Wright, and others. Then, transitioning to a 1998 talk titled Blues Legacies and Black Feminism, we’ll hear the venerable Angela Davis trace the trajectory of early blues artists, including Gertrude “Ma” Rainy, Bessie Smith, and Billie Holiday, to illustrate how Black women helped shape Feminist historical traditions through their music.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

FTV 573 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in London, 1964

Posted in Update on January 5th, 2018

This week on From the Vault we proudly feature a recording of a speech by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., discovered in December 2014. The recording has been verified as the only known recording of the 62-minute speech made in London on December 7, 1964, and is thought to be the only known record of a comprehensive public statement by King on apartheid in South Africa.

The speech was recorded at City Temple Hall in central London where King had been invited to speak on South Africa. When King was chosen to receive the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize, he went to London on the way to accepting that prize in Oslo, Norway. Speaking to an overflowing audience, he added the topics of the history of slavery, Supreme Court rulings, Greek philosophy, nonviolent resistance, misunderstandings about the doctrine of loving ones’ enemies, the legislative process of desegregation in America, registration of black voters, and ending bigotry throughout the planet. When speaking about South Africa, he read a prepared written statement that called for sanctions to end apartheid.

The recording on tape was made by Saul Bernstein, identified as a “Pacifica European Correspondent.” In order to not lose any of the speech while changing tapes, he used a “half-track format” with half of the speech recorded in one direction on half of the tape and the rest of the speech recorded on the other half of the tape going the opposite direction. The entire speech was converted to digital format by the Pacifica Radio Archives staff, who corrected sound distortions.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.