Archive for August, 2014

FTV 433 Steve Post Tribute

Posted in Update on August 29th, 2014

This week on From the Vault we pay tribute to a New York radio icon, Steve Post, who was one of a small cadre of radio broadcasters who helped in the creation of Free Form radio at Pacifica Station WBAI in the 1960’s. Many New Yorkers today are familiar with Post from his long stint hosting Morning Music with Steve Post and The NO Show on WNYC beginning in 1982, but few people knew that he began his radio career in 1965 at WBAI. Post, along with his WBAI colleagues Bob Fass, Dale Minor, Julius Lester, Larry Josephson, Neil Conan, Baird Searles among others, helped transform the way we listen to radio.

In this episode, we present two very different programs produced by Post during his time at WBAI. First, we feature a 1969 documentary on the life and work of political activist Abraham Johannes Muste. Then we’ll catch a ride with Steve Post and his colleagues as they venture onto the New York streets in the darkest hours to explore the raw underbelly of the city and document the happenings of the people that are awake while the rest of the city sleeps, in a program from 1970 called In the Shank of the Night.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 432 Back-to-School National Broadcast

Posted in Update on August 23rd, 2014

This week on From the Vault we present highlights from our Back-to-School twelve-hour national broadcast that supported the Pacifica Radio Archives mission to discover, restore and make accessible the audio treasures in our collection.

– Host Margaret Prescod features Martin Luther King, Jr. speaking on non-violence.

– KPFK host Sonali Kolhatkar and KPFA host Brian Edwards Tiekert play selections for a recording of the 1964 funeral of James Chaney.

– KPFK host Eric Mann plays Malcolm X’s famous speech “The Ballot or The Bullet,” delivered right before the 1964 Presidential election.

– Pacifica Radio Archive Director Brian DeShazor, PRA Grant Advisor Adi Gevins, PRA Archivist Jolene Beiser and KPFK Senior Producer Christine Blosdale discuss the project American Women Making History and Culture: 1963-1982, and play selections from a recording made by Marcia Tomkins during her infiltration of the Ku Klux Klan in 1964.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 431 Edward Said

Posted in Update on August 15th, 2014

This Week on From the Vault we honor one of the great visionary thinkers of our time, Edward Said.

Edward Said was born in Jerusalem in 1935, the son of an American citizen of Christian Protestant Palestinian origins. After earning a bachelor’s degree at Princeton University and a masters and Ph.D. in English Literature at Harvard University, Said became Professor of Comparative Literature at Columbia University in 1963, a teaching post he would hold up until his death on September 25th, 2003.

Edward Said would use his duel heritage to help bridge the gap between the West and the Middle East and to improve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict with his acute and sober analysis. Today we will present selections from Pacifica Radio Archive’s thirty-year history with Dr. Said.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 430 Twenty Days in Santa Rita

Posted in Update on August 8th, 2014

This week on From the Vault we journey back to 1968 in celebration of Pacifica Radio’s strong and enduring tradition covering the anti-war protests and interviewing anti-war protesters. In the recording Twenty Days in Santa Rita, legendary Pacifica Radio-KPFA Public Affairs Director Elsa Knight Thompson interviews two women who were detained for twenty days in the Santa Rita Jail in Alameda County, California for protesting the Vietnam War. Just released from the Santa Rita Rehabilitation Center, Emily Lewis, public health nurse and wife of a Berkeley doctor, and Lillian Rubin, research assistant in sociology at the University of California, spoke at length with Elsa Knight Thompson about their experiences in jail, which was the result of their war-protest activities at the Oakland Induction Center in December 1967. The Santa Rita Jail became widely-known for holding the likes of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Joan Baez, and others who participated in the anti-war movement and draft resistance movement during the 1960’s.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the GRAMMY Foundation and the National Historical Publications and Records Commission at the National Archives and Records Administration, and past grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners. We also thank our partners and collaborators at the Pop-Up Archive, Amara, Other Minds Archives, George Blood Audio, and the California Audio Visual Preservation Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play