Archive for August, 2013

FTV 381 Freedom Now! 1963 (Part 2 of 2)

Posted in Update on August 30th, 2013

As the United States entered the 1960’s, perhaps no other city in America was as segregated as Birmingham, Alabama, and this basic condition expected the likely conclusion of a civil rights flashpoint. In early 1963, events came to a head, and Pacifica Radio reporters were there to capture it all on magnetic audio tape — producing recordings that have been the charge of Pacifica Radio Archives ever since, and represent the very best of Pacifica’s mission and creativity.

This week on From the Vault, we continue our journey back to 1963, to the volatile and unforgiving streets of Birmingham, and experience the sounds of an era unvarnished, within earshot of history unpurified, through the second half of the brilliant documentary Freedom Now! produced by Chris Koch, Dale Minor, and Robert Kramer in 1963. Freedom Now! documents the struggle for for racial equality that tore this troubled city apart, and the demonstrations that led to an agreemnet between citizens of all colors. Includes actuality of of the rally, riots, and the voices of Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, and Birmingham’s Mayor and Sheriff.
This recording was preserved through a generous grant from the Ford Foundation in 2006.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 380 Freedom Now! 1963 (Part 1 of 2)

Posted in Update on August 23rd, 2013

As the United States entered the 1960’s, perhaps no other city in America was as segregated as Birmingham, Alabama, and this basic condition expected the likely conclusion of a civil rights flashpoint. In early 1963, events came to a head, and Pacifica Radio reporters were there to capture it all on magnetic audio tape — producing recordings that have been the charge of Pacifica Radio Archives ever since, and represent the very best of Pacifica’s mission and creativity.

This week on From the Vault, we jump back to 1963, to the volatile and unforgiving streets of Birmingham, and experience the sounds of an era unvarnished, within earshot of history unpurified, through the brilliant documentary Freedom Now! produced by Chris Koch, Dale Minor, and Robert Kramer in 1963. Freedom Now! documents the struggle for for racial equality that tore this troubled city apart, and the demonstrations that led to an agreemnet between citizens of all colors. Includes actuality of of the rally, riots, and the voices of Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph Abernathy, and Birmingham’s Mayor and Sheriff.
This recording was preserved through a generous grant from the Ford Foundation in 2006.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 379 I Have A Dream

Posted in Update on August 19th, 2013

This week on From the Vault we commemorate the 50th anniversary of the 1963 March on Washington for Civil Rights by listening to a unique news documentary from our historic collection titled I Have A Dream. It was produced by Pacifica Radio three days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. on April 4th, 1968 as a celebration of King’s life and work and to serve as genuine account of the revolutionary movements that were happening in the latter part of the decade. To help contextualize this radio documentary, Stanford University history professor Dr. Clayborne Carson explains the significance of the extraordinary audio for those who heard its original broadcast, and those hearing it for the first time today.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 378 Black August

Posted in Update on August 9th, 2013

On this edition of From the Vault we turn the clock back to 1993 when Pacifica Radio devoted an entire day to recognize Black August, the annual commemoration of the liberation struggles of Africans Americans that began with the killing of prisoner George Jackson on August 21, 1971. The 1993 Black August producers, in conducting interviews and listening to recordings from Pacifica Radio Archives, focused on the treatment of prisoners and the human rights abuses related to solitary confinement in California penal institutions. Highlights from two-decade-old special include an interview with Georgia Bea Jackson (George Jackson’s mother) and selections of George Jackson in his own voice. We’ll also speak with Paige St. John, a writer with the Los Angeles Times covering prison issues, on the contemporary human rights issues in correctional institutions.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play

FTV 377 Filmmaker Stanley Kramer Centennial

Posted in Update on August 2nd, 2013

This week on From the Vault we join the centennial celebration of Stanley Kramer, legendary Hollywood film producer and director. Kramer’s 35 films, which were responsible for 16 Academy Awards through 85 Oscar nominations, include acclaimed classics such as Death of a Salesman (1952), The Wild One (1954), The Defiant Ones (1958), Ship of Fools (1965), and Bless the Beasts and Children (1971). In this episode, we’ll share with you a 1968 interview with Kramer in San Francisco for the opening of perhaps one of his best-known films, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), a comedic drama that tackles the emotions of interracial marriage, which was still illegal in 17 states when the movie premiered. Then, we’ll speak with Karen Sharpe Kramer (Stanly Kramer’s widow) and daughter Katharine ‘Kat’ Kramer about their lives in the family of the visionary filmmaker, and how they are continuing his legacy.

UCLA Film & Television Archive and the Hugh M. Hefner Classic American Film Program present Champion: The Stanley Kramer Centennial, a series celebrating influential producer-director Stanley Kramer through fifteen landmark films screening August 9, 2013 – September 29, 2013 at the Billy Wilder Theater in Los Angeles.

Special thanks to Karen Sharpe Kramer and Kat Kramer, co-producer of the film series Films That Change the World.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Play