Archive for July, 2011

FTV 272 Jim Morrison, Poet

Posted in Update on July 29th, 2011

“Expose yourself to your deepest fear; after that, fear has no power, and the fear of freedom shrinks and vanishes. You are free.”
~Jim Morrison (1943-1971)

This week we’ll get a little better acquainted with the short life of rock star, poet, and icon Jim Morrison with the help of a beautiful radio documentary called Artist in Hell, produced by Clare Spark in 1971. Of course, it would be easy to focus on Morrison’s wild antics and excess, as that kind of behavior always leaves a high water mark on someone’s life for the ages to see, but instead, we’ll hear his closest friends describe the life of a tortured genius, a man with not nearly enough names for all of the colors he wished to paint. The Doors band members Robbie Krieger and Ray Manzarek speak candidly about their close friend, as do producer Paul Rothchild; while David Birnie, Digby Deal, Harvey Purr and others read from Morrison’s poetry and his Lord’s Notes On Vision.

In the second half of From the Vault, we’ll hear The Doors keyboardist Ray Manzarek speaking at The Midnight Special Bookstore in Santa Monica on September 12, 1998. Manzarek speaks on The Doors and Morrison, reading selections of Morrison’s poetry, and sharing his insights and recollections on the transformation of four normal guys who met in Venice, hung out on the beach, and became one of the most legendary rock-n-roll bands the genre has yet seen.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 271 Robert Duncan

Posted in Update on July 22nd, 2011

This week on From the Vault we feature poet Robert Duncan. As a contemporary of Charles Olson, Robert Creely, Denise Levertov, and Jack Spicer, Duncan wrote poetry that became the artistic bridge spanning between the generation of artists like Robert Frost, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, and Dylan Thomas to the generation of Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti, DiPrima, Keroac, and the Beat Poets. We present this October 28, 1960 recording of Robert Duncan reading dozens of his classic poems at the University of California, Berkeley with the excitement and reverence commanded by this rare and important document of 20th Century writing.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about and purchase copies of the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 270 Jane Fonda

Posted in Update on July 15th, 2011

In this week’s episode of From the Vault we offer an insider’s glimpse into a true American iconoclast, Jane Fonda.

Fonda is probably best known for equal parts acting, positions on critical ethical, moral and feminist issues and an instructional fitness and workout empire. Already a prolific and respected actor by the mid-60’s, in 1968 Fonda would attend her first anti Vietnam War protest, and her civic life would change forever. With boundless energy, Jane Fonda continued to hone her craft, notably with her Academy Award performance alongside Donald Sutherland in 1971’s crime thriller Klute, but her passion for activism never seemed to wane. She would make a high profile fact-finding trip to North Vietnam in 1972 with her future husband Tom Hayden, but her effort to help bring peace to the messy conflict was reduced by her retractors to a condescending moniker: “Hanoi Jane.”

Fonda would go on to make many more films, winning accolades again with a performance in the 1978 drama Coming Home with Jon Voight, a vehicle to address the tragedy of war on the big screen; 1979′s China Syndrome with Jack Lemmon and Michael Douglas, about the dangers of Nuclear Energy; the 1980 comedy hit Nine to Five with Dolly Parton and Lily Tomlin, about sexism in the workplace; and the 1981 Academy Award winning film On Golden Pond with her father Henry Fonda.

Today, From the Vault sneaks back to the 1975 San Francisco Film Festival, where Jane Fonda was honored for her work by host Mark Chase. Fonda uses the opportunity to talk about being part of the film industry as it transitioned out of the old studio system of career contracts, of being a woman in the film industry, and of the causes she has been passionate about.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about and purchase copies of the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 269 Japanese in California 1959

Posted in Update on July 11th, 2011

In this edition of From the Vault we present Pacifica Radio’s earliest known recording of Japanese Americans and their families from California talking about life in America. This extraordinary 1959 recording documents stories of family life before the war and how the internment process changed lives forever. Voices include ordinary citizens, teachers, students, lawyers, architects, and farmers, and Hito Okada, one of the founders and former presidents of the oldest and largest Asian civil rights group, the Japanese America Citizens League.

The original recording was produced by Marshall Windmiller from Pacifica Station KPFA 94.1 in Berkeley California.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about and purchase copies of the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 268 Gwendolyn Brooks and LeRoi Jones, a.k.a. Amiri Baraka

Posted in Update on July 1st, 2011

This week on From the Vault we present one of Pacifica Radio’s newly-restored audio treasures, ‘rediscovered’ during preservation work funded by our most recent National Endowment for the Arts grant. This 1964 recording, fittingly titled A Poetry Reading, features Gwendolyn Brooks and LeRoi Jones and is as historically significant as any recording in the Pacifica Radio Archives collection. Gwendolyn Brooks delivers a remarkable performance, reading a range from her earliest work (A Street in Bronzeville, 1945) to her Pulitzer Prize-winning collection (Annie Allen, 1950) to her most current prose that year of 1964. LeRoi Jones reminds us of his roots in the Beat Generation and his talent as a Greenwich Village publisher with his last major reading before the assassination Malcolm X. After the assassination, Jones would leave his family, distance himself from the white Beat Poets, and relocate to Harlem — transforming himself into Black Nationalist Amiri Baraka.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about and purchase copies of the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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