Archive for October, 2010

FTV 233 Pacifica and the Free Speech Movement

Posted in Update on October 29th, 2010

This week on From The Vault we contrast today’s political movements with the Free Speech Movement of 1964, an organic occurrence on the Campus of the University of California at Berkeley that was fueled by the same desire to stand up for freedoms protected by the United States Constitution.

On October 1, 1964 former UC Berkeley Graduate Student Kinky Friedman (Jack Weinberg) was arrested for violating new school policy for tabling on school grounds. Weinberg was loaded into the squad car, but before the officer could leave hundreds of students surrounded the vehicle, ultimately using the police car itself as a pulpit, as the Free Speech Movement was launched.

As with most historically significant events, they don’t happen in a vacuum. They evolve from events that preceded them, events that sometimes go unnoticed. As we listen to a segment from the 1979 documentary on the Free Speech Movement, we hear from Bettina Aptheker, one of the original leaders of the movement, reflecting back on the events leading up to the October 1, 1964 student action.

Much of the daily activity of the Free Speech Movement participants was recorded by KPFA reporters, who lugged portable reel-to-reel machines around the city, following the stream of significant events that took place throughout 1964-1965. Gary Handman, Director of the Media Resources Center at the University of California Berkeley Moffit Library, describes the significance of the Pacifica audio recordings.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 232 The Alexandria Quartet

Posted in Update on October 22nd, 2010

Today on From the Vault, we present selections from a 1976 marathon reading of The Alexandria Quartet, a critically acclaimed collection of four novels by Lawrence Durrell: Justine (1957), Balthazar (1958), Mountolive (1958), and Clea (1960). Produced for KPFK Los Angeles by Jay Kugelman, this broadcast of The Alexandria Quartet began on Christmas Day in 1976 and used eighty talented readers, including the likes of Peter Finch, Julie Christie, Samantha Eggar, Cloris Leachman, Roscoe Lee Browne, Sada Thompson, Brock Peters, and Will Geer to name a few.

Before we listen to the poetic and evocative writings of Lawrence Durrell, however, we speak with Don Kaczvinsky, who is Director of the School of Literature and Language at Louisiana Technical University, President of the International Lawrence Durrell Society, and, as you might expect, an expert on The Alexandria Quartet.

Special thanks to Jay Kugelman for his incredible work almost 35 years ago.

From the Vault is presented through the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project, funded in part by an award from the National Endowment for the Arts, past grants from the Grammy
Foundation, the Ford Foundation, and the American Archive funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, along with the generous support of Pacifica Radio Listeners.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 231 The Triangle Fire of 1911

Posted in Update on October 15th, 2010

This week on From The Vault we remember the victims of the 1911 Triangle fire with a 1984 radio documentary produced for WBAI-New York by Beth Friend and Steve Stoew, with technical production by David Rapkin. The program examines the fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist Company factory which took place in New York City on March 26th, 1911. You will hear interviews with a survivor of the fire, other contemporaries of that era, and a dramatic recreation of the fire complete with music and readings.  You will also listen to an interview with Pauline Newman, the first woman organizer for the ILGWU (International Ladies Garment Workers Union).

As we researched the Triangle Fire we found a website exhibit at the Kheel Center at Cornell University’s Industrial and Labor Relations School that gives us the perfect introduction to today’s program. With their permission it reads as follows:

“The fire at the Triangle Waist Company in New York City, which claimed the lives of 146 young immigrant workers, is one of the worst disasters since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution. This incident has had great significance to this day because it highlights the inhumane working conditions to which industrial workers can be subjected. To many, its horrors epitomize the extremes of industrialism. The tragedy still dwells in the collective memory of the nation and of the international labor movement. The victims of the tragedy are still celebrated as martyrs at the hands of industrial greed.”

To learn more online, please visit the Triangle Factory Fire Exhibit, located at The Kheel Center at Catherwood Library, Industrial and Labor Relations School, Cornell University.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 230 Jimi Hendrix

Posted in Update on October 8th, 2010

This week on From The Vault we look at one of the great creative spirits of the 20th Century, Jimi Hendrix. His short career starting in 1966, Hendrix would stun crowds his virtuosity and groundbreaking manipulation of the electric guitar until his untimely death at age of 27 in 1970.

Jump forward to 1982, when a team of talented producers (including Bari Scott, Craig Street and Don West) from Pacifica’s flagship station KPFA 94.1 FM – Berkeley enlisted the help of Hendrix biographer David Henderson, author of Jimi Hendrix: Voodoo Child of the Aquarian Age (1978). Their collaboration led to an amazing four-hour documentary that compiled previously unheard and rare recordings exploring this musical legend. The documentary includes music, of course, but also interviews with the people who knew Hendrix best: his family, blues singer John Hammond (who befriended the young Hendrix in Greenwich Village in 1966), Chas Chandler from The Animals (who brought Hendrix to England and became his manager), as well as his bandmates and Hendrix biographer David Henderson.

Since then, many of these performances have been released or are otherwise available on the Internet – but back in 1982, this was absolutely a masterpiece production, and despite its age, we think it still sounds pretty good today! We hope you enjoy this special one-hour version of the 1982 Pacifica Radio landmark documentary Jimi Hendrix.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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FTV 229 An Honorable Tradition, A Proud Record: A History of Homosexual Service in the Military

Posted in Uncategorized, Update on October 1st, 2010

This week on From the Vault we listen to highlights from a 1993 program titled An Honorable Tradition, A Proud Record: A History of Homosexual Service in the Military, produced by Veterans for Peace. Recorded at Patriotic Hall in Los Angeles, this is the captivating story of gay veterans sharing their experiences in the military and how their sexual orientation led to their dismissal from service. First, however, we check in with the international gay and lesbian radio program This Way Out for their weekly news report, as Congress mulls over repealing the 1994 Pentagon policy of “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell.”

Special thanks to This Way Out producer Lucia Chappelle for providing audio for this episode.

From the Vault is presented as part of the Pacifica Radio Archives Preservation and Access Project.

PURCHASE a copy of this program or learn more about the historic archival recordings used within this episode. To purchase a CD copy of this program by phone, please call Pacifica Radio Archives at 800.735.0230 x 262.

Click here to send an email to From the Vault.

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